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Murphysegg

Freezing your catch

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Obviously fresh is best, but whats the do's & dont's on freezing fish. I hate to think they were sacrificed just to end up as crab bait.I'm looking for advice on table fish like Whiting, Gar, Snook, Tommies, ST's. Whats the max time these csn spend in the freezer without spoiling? & any tips on preventing freezer burn?Any feedback appreciated. J

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Dry off the catch properly prior to freezingIndividually wrap meal sized portionsCover and remove as much air as possibleUse within 3 monthsDon't take more than you need to prevent wastageAnything past it's prime, use for bait or burley

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A trick I learned from an old and wise fisho many years ago for fillets of such species such as Whiting, Gar, Tommies , Mullet etc. is as follows:1. Put the fillets in a shallow tray (old polystyrene meat trays from your supermarket which have been washed and sterilised work a treat)2. Cover the fillets with (preferably) fresh seawater and freeze3. Put the frozen blocks into an appropriately sized freezer bag with the date of freezing written on the bag and seal with a twist tie.4. The seawater keeps the fillets moist and prevents freezer burn. To use, simply defrost in your fridge for a day or two before cooking. Recommended storage time: from 3 to 6 months maximumHope this helps...Cheersarcherfish

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my method is similar to Archerfish, I simply make up a salt bath and place the fillets in it for a few minutes before transfering the wet fillets into freezer bags, it stops the fillets from drying out and they come out tasting fresher than just simply freezing them normally, I thought it would have the opposite effect when a mate told me about it (salt sucking moisture from fillets) but it works a treat.cheers

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6 months, hmmm...- Fish filleted, rinse in sea water of course- Fillets onto a deep tray, layer of paper towelling, another layer of fillets, another layer of paper etc- Into the fridge overnight (towelling absorbs excess moisture)- Following day progressively remove fish from the fillet/paper pile as required for each cryovac pack, vac seal and straight into the freezerSnapper and whiting - no probs 9-12 months later. True story. ;)

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A trick I learned from an old and wise fisho many years ago for fillets of such species such as Whiting' date=' Gar, Tommies , Mullet etc. is as follows:1. Put the fillets in a shallow tray (old polystyrene meat trays from your supermarket which have been washed and sterilised work a treat)2. Cover the fillets with (preferably) fresh seawater and freeze3. Put the frozen blocks into an appropriately sized freezer bag with the date of freezing written on the bag and seal with a twist tie.4. The seawater keeps the fillets moist and prevents freezer burn. To use, simply defrost in your fridge for a day or two before cooking. Recommended storage time: from 3 to 6 months maximumHope this helps...Cheersarcherfish[/quote']My pop used to use this method all the time, the cooked fillets used to taste great. He had a dozen or so shallow plastic/alu trays. He would collect the fresh seawater when were out in the boat.

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Vacuum seal the fillets and they will not get freezer burn and will last a lot longer.We ate some squid the other night that had been in my freezer for 11 months. Couldn't tell it had been in there that long.It's the only way to go. IMOSam.

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