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tonyb

NEED a pheasant tailfeather!

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Hi guys, binalong the UK two months and found the local trout going nuts for bead headed, pheasant tail nymphs :ohmy: Fishermans Paradise in the City have no Pheasant tail feathers in but, they will be 25 bucks when they do come in. Could probably buy half a dozen nymphs for that price which would be enough for my immediate needs.Any kind soul out there want to part with even a half of a feather to get me started? I have fox tail, buck tail and natural rabbit fur for exchange and am willing to travel a bit tho' I'm based down south near Hallet Cove. PM appreciated.Cheers, Tony.Posted Image]

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If all else fails theres a stuffed one behind the bar at the botanic hotel,on the wall on the left hand side.Not many dwell over that side of the bar...order a drink that you assume they dont have,wait for the barmaid to turn her back and scrummage through the fridge ,and hey presto.....tonyb has left the building with a nice pheasant feather hanging out his pocket. :laugh::laugh:

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Agreed Dave, also binalong Spotlight quite a bit, unfortunately a Pheasants tail feather would probably, no,definitely, not be in there and that was my need until so many kind offers recently came up from some top blokes on this Forum B) thanks for the heads up all the same mate ;)

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I get mine from Tambo fine feathers.Good quality 2 year old birds.3 year old birds have longer hackles and are better for tying with but are very hard to source.Tambo also have excellent peacock in different grades and Guinea fowl.

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Take the missus for a lunch at Maggie Beers Pheasant Farm Kitchen at Nuriootpa. I'm sure you could get a couple while you are there if you asked nicely, as they have cages of pheasants of many different varieties.

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Thanks Ranger, also binalong Maggie Beers place many moons hence, what a good idea to re visit it B)Luv to flick a Squidgy Bug through that Dam out front of the Restaurant/Shop as well, gotta be stiff with reddys in there mate. :fishing: Rollcast: Thanks for the heads up on Tambo Fine Feathers and only at Swan Reach in Vic!Should be real handy in the future if I use Australia Post ;)I recently had a run down to a SAFWAA Trout Dam with one of our top class Fly fisher/Tiers and yes, the Aussie trout took a strong liking to my new Pheasant tailed nymphs :clap: Good story, good ending, cheers for all the help guys :clap::clap::clap:

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Luv to flick a Squidgy Bug through that Dam out front of the Restaurant/Shop as well' date=' gotta be stiff with reddys in there mate. [/quote']Those are close to my own exact words when me and the missus were recently lunching there! :laugh:

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The first pheasant tail nymph was tied by Sawyer ,a river keeper on the Test. It used only copper wire and the barbs of the centre tail feather of a cock ring neck pheasant.These days most tiers incorperate thread into the tying process for ease of tying.Common variants include peacock hearl in the thorax or beadheads.Sawyer would slowly lift the rod tip causing the nymph to swim up through the water column imitating the hatching naturals.This style of fishing led to the term "induced take".Traditionalists fond of fishing wet flies of the time were critical of Sawyers new nymphing techniques.I have caught more trout with this fly in varying weights and sizes than any other,in mainland oz ,Tassy and NZ.In faster water in NZI often cheat by hanging it under a small piece of sheeps wool.sourced off a barb wire fence as an indicator.Dead drift or very slow figure eight retrieve if fishing still water.CheersRollcast

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The first pheasant tail nymph was tied by Sawyer ' date='a river keeper on the Test. It used only copper wire and the barbs of the centre tail feather of a cock ring neck pheasant.These days most tiers incorperate thread into the tying process for ease of tying.Common variants include peacock hearl in the thorax or beadheads.Sawyer would slowly lift the rod tip causing the nymph to swim up through the water column imitating the hatching naturals.This style of fishing led to the term "induced take".Traditionalists fond of fishing wet flies of the time were critical of Sawyers new nymphing techniques.I have caught more trout with this fly in varying weights and sizes than any other,in mainland oz ,Tassy and NZ.In faster water in NZI often cheat by hanging it under a small piece of sheeps wool.sourced off a barb wire fence as an indicator.Dead drift or very slow figure eight retrieve if fishing still water.CheersRollcast[/quote']Many thanks rollcast, your information certainly adds a whole new dimension to a very popular yet simple Fly :clap:

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Just a little thank you to the guys :clap::clap::clap: Nailed this near kilo Brownie with my first cast on a SAFWAA Dam at a "nymphing" trout :ohmy: :ohmy: You can just see the gold bead headed pheasant tail nymph sourced from the guys on this thread!What a thrill and this fish fought like a Rainbow on steroids! I've caught many trout and Rainbows seem to be the most spectacular, while Browns seem a lot more dogged and dour going to the bottom and strongly fighting from there!This little lady cleared the water a half a dozen times! Awesome :woohoo: Thanks again. :clap::clap::clap: Cheers, Tony.Posted Image

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