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bjorn2fish

Soft Plastics guide for variety of species

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Hi everyone,I'm thinking of getting a few new packs of soft plastics for a variety of species and am currently looking at colours styles etc and thought I might start up a topic with everyone's recommendations for what plastic they've had success on for specific species, Salt and Fresh, Large and Small.E.g.

 

  • Z-Man Curl TailZ GrubZ 2.5" Motor Oil for Bream in the Port River
  • Berkley Gulp Minnow 3" Lime Tiger for Mulloway in the Coorong

 

Not looking for brand wars just colours, styles etc.If you add a scent to your plastics what have you found works for you?

 

Cheers

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Hi Bjorn,For me, when I used to have my SP mojo on, :( Squidgy Wrigglers Bloodworm 80mm and Zman Grubs Motoroil for Bream and FlatheadandSplit tails or flick baits for Salmon and Snook. Favourite is the light green Hollow Belly Split Tail. ;) Always use S-factor, whether it really works or not is anyones guess! :blink:

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Used some 6.5" Gulp Nemesis in white glow on snapper recently. Great size for shallow water fishing and the long curly tail worked a treat. Have always liked curl tail plastics for snapper and the Nemesis is right up there.

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Z-man grubs 2.5 inch Motor Oil for bream, Estuary Perch, tommies, Salmon trout, flathead, gar etc. Squidgy flickbaits 80mm Pillie for snook, salmon, mulloway, snapper, etc.Gulp! Jerkshads 5inch in Lime Tiger or BBQ Chicken for mulloway, snapper, salmon etc.These are the lures that have given me the most success.

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Flickbaits' date=' pearl white, 110mm. have caught Tommies, Salmon, Flathead and Snapper on them. Definitely my fave SP[/quote']having gone and looked at the packet they were 80mm, u were right to be impressed jagger, my mistake. if i can change my original post slightly, my fav SP is a flickbait of an appropriate size to suit the fish u r targeting with white being my fav colour. evil minnow and pillie work well too.

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Squidgy Fish black & gold 65mm for flattys are my favorite.Bream the little 2" Gulp Shrimp go good for bream and flattysSquidgy Lobby's (the larger size, cut in half leaving the head and 1 "lump", with a hidden weight/weedless jighead) are great for fishing in shallow weed beds/oyster racks.

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and just yesterday I popped into Sportfishing scene and grabbed a pack of the berkley gulp sand worm in bloody color for my yellow fin beach fishing [attachment=17126]Gulp.jpg[/attachment] cheers 4THA

Have you actually used these with success on the YFW? I went into my local tackle to get some live worms, and i nearly bought a pack of these for when i head out after closing time. They guy told me not to bother and save my money as they dont work. is there a particular method you use with them?

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Yeah dude I've caught YFW and bream on those Gulp Sandworms in Camo but I cut them down to about 3 inches in length to avoid tail biters, this way you get 3 lures out of 1 too and they probably work out cheaper than live tubies or similar worms

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In winter, I've found the slower the better with lots of long pauses and no sudden jerks. I even cut my jig heads down to the minimum weight to slow down the sink as much as possible without affecting the action of the tail, as most of my hits are on the sink.

Summer is abit easier, and a large variety of retrieves and actions seem to work. Don't forget the pause!!!!!! Some hard bodies need the right rod to get the full action.

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