Jump to content

Meppstas

Members
  • Content Count

    2,771
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    183

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from Des in Adrian's Trout Kit Plus..   
    This article will hopefully be of some help to those of you who chase trout in the rivers & streams there in South Aust, the tactics I use here in Tasmania are the same that I taught myself when I started trout fishing there in the Finness, Light, Torrens, Okanparinga & Sturt Rivers as well as Sixth Creek plus a few other small streams. The only difference to back then when I first started trout fishing (mid1960's) is the tackle is way better now days..
    cheers
    Adrian
    Adrian's Trout Kit plus...
    I was asked sometime ago if I could run through my trout kit from head to toe, such as specific clothing, waders, boots, glasses, camera, drinks, snacks, rod, reel, tackle and whatever else I have for trout fishing the rivers here in Tasmania. I was also asked about some memorable moments plus a few other things that may be of interest, it's something I've never thought about really, probably something I've just taken for granted. So let's start off with the waders & boots etc...
    * The Wading gear: Seeing as I only fish rivers/streams & creeks for trout my first pair of waders were the Hornes waist waders with the Blundstone boots. They were a tough long lasting set of waders, but they were very heavy, the boots had no grip on the slippery, rocky river bottoms, after six trout seasons of using them it was time for a change. A friend told me to go for a pair of breathable waders and wading boots, so that's what I did. My first pair was a cheap ($120-00) unbranded set that I bought online, they came from China, that pair didn't get me through the first season, the neoprene foot leaked as did the welded seams. I needed a pair that would last a lot longer than that because I average 90 trips a year during the nine months of each trout season, each trip varies from 3 to 5 hours of wading a river. After quite a lot of researching some of the more expensive brands I went for the Redington, Compass & Bassdash breathable waders with the neoprene stocking feet, the reason I went for those waders was because they're all quality lightweight waders that I knew would get me through many trout seasons. They did and ten years on I'm still using those waders, actually I am now on my third pair. A friend of mine gave me a brand new pair of the cheap unbranded waders which I now use in the small streams & creeks, I do this to save the wear and tear on the more expensive waders.

    Remember, always safety first when fishing a river, even more so when it's a fast water.
    ** The wading boots, I went for were the Korkers with the interchangeable soles, sticky rubber, felt & studded felt. The soles I use on the majority of my river trips are the studded felt soles, they have excellent grip in the larger rivers that are very rocky and slippery. The plain rubber & felt soles are ideal from small streams & creeks that have small gravelly bottoms with the odd rocky sections in them, so that's my wading set up. When buying a pair of wading boots you must order them one size larger than your normal shoe size to allow for the thickness of the neoprene stocking foot, eg: your shoe size 10, wading boot size 11. The main reason I went for a quality wading boot with an interchangeable sole is because of the amount of kilometres I walk to get to & from a river which can be 2 kms to 6 kms a trip, that's not counting the distance spent in a river fishing for trout.
    ** Clothing: I'm a believer of wearing clothing that blends in with the surroundings one's fishing in. Most of the rivers/streams & creeks I fish have fairly dense foliage on both sides of them, so the majority of my clothing is dark green & khaki coloured items. If I'm heading to the more open larger rivers and the grass covered river banks have dried off then I'll wear a beige coloured outfit. When chasing trout in clear waters on sunny days a dark colour will stand out in an open river, that will spook a trout in no time at all. If possible stay as close to the side of the river that has dense foliage on it. I have seen a trout sitting in clear open water and a small wagtail had flown over, the small shadow of that small bird was enough to spook it. Actually I prefer fishing in dull heavy overcast humid weather conditions with very light drizzle, one can wear the dark or lighter colours in these conditions. 

    Spin fishing the Mersey River in full wading gear.
    ** Fishing vests: I have a few of these, both in green/khaki, camouflage and light brown/beige, all have plenty of pockets for the many small lure boxes I carry. They are short vests as well, there's nothing worse than wearing a long vest and getting them wet when fishing in waist deep water. Not only that, the pockets that hold the lure boxes in a long vest fill up with water, this I found out from experience.
    ** Rods: The rods I use are Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3 kg, 6', 6'6'' & 7' lengths, these are a beautiful light weight well balanced spin rods, perfect for what I require when chasing trout in the rivers and streams. I can fish for 4 to 5 hours covering anything from 1.5 kms to 3 kms without getting tired in the shoulders which is a real benefit when spin fishing rivers, how many casts and retrieves I would have over that time & distance would be in the high hundreds I would imagine.

    Okuma Celilo Finnese 6'6'' ULS 1-3kg trout rod, Okuma Helios HSX-20 spinning reel, a well balanced set up.

    One of the rewards of small stream fishing.
    ** Reels: All reels used are Okuma spinning reels, the models are as follows: Okuma ITX-1000, Okuma Inspira ISX-20B, Okuma Helios HSX-20, Epixor EXPT-20 & Okuma Ceymar C-10 spinning reels, these spinning reels are nice lightweight spinning reels that are well suited to the Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3kg (2-6lb) spin rods.
    ** Fishing lines: There's only one brand I use and have done so for many years, it's the Australian made & owned Platypus line which has come a long way since I first used it back in the 60's. The Super 100 UHT & Pulse Mono 4lb/6lb monofilament are the main ones I use in the clear & brown colour. The other Platypus line used is the Pretest Premium Grade 4lb monofilament, the 6lb leader is the Platypus Stealth FC 100% fluorocarbon line.
     

    A nice mix of lures used for the larger rivers.
    ** Lures: It's Mepps, Mepps & more Mepps inline spinners that I have in my small lures boxes, they range from the smallest & lightest starting with the #00 (0.9gms) Steamepps (black, gold, silver blades) #00 (1.5gm) Black Fury (black, gold, copper blades), Aglia ( Plain, Mouche Noire, Aglia Mouche Rouge in black, gold, copper blades), Bug spinners (Stone Fly, March Brown, White Miller & Cherry), Comet (silver, gold blades). These small lightweight spinners are ideal for shallow small streams/rivers as well as some of the larger rivers I fish. Next are the size #0 (2.5gm) & #1 (3.5gm) inline spinners same models & blade colours as above but with a few different models included such as the Aglia Fluo tiger, rainbo, brown & phospho colours, Aglia Furia, Aglia TW & TW Streamer. So as you can see I do carry a large variety of Mepps inline spinners, all of which I have caught trout on. I also carry several small hard body lures that get used on the trout when they are not in the mood to take the Mepps inline spinners which isn't all that often because 98% of my trout are caught on the Mepps spinners. The hard body lures are mostly in the 30mm to 60mm size, floating & suspending models, Pontoon 21, Daiwa, Atomic Hardz, Goldy minnow, & Rapala lure are just some of hard bodies I have on hand. I also carry a few Ghost & Switchblade lures as well, there's nothing better than having a good mix of lures when trout fishing rivers & streams.

    A good mix of lures etc that I use in the rivers/streams.
    ** Other items that I have with me when trout fishing the rivers: One of the main items is a landing net, the ones I used are all wooden framed with a soft plastic mesh that doesn't damage the fish. The good thing about using a wooden landing net is that it floats and I have mine attached to my vest with a two meter alligator strap. That way if I drop it while fast water fishing it floats and I just pull it back in with the strap. Other items I carry in the vest are: Small plastic containers with snap swivels, anti-kinks in it in case for some reason the main line breaks, you'll need them for replacement of the lost anti-kink set up. Small sharpening stone to keep the lure hooks sharps at all times, a small pair of pointed nose pliers that are used to pull a treble hook from a finger or hand, accidents do happen when handling a fish, it's quite easy to have the lure fly from the fish and lob in the finger or hand when it tosses the spinner/lure. Also one can get a hook in the hand when trying to take hold of a fish that's playing up in the net, the pliers are ideal for when you need to remove the hook. The pliers are also used for setting the treble hooks off center, I'm not a fan of straight trebles.

    My fishing vest set up.
     
    Digital scales are essential if you wish to weigh your catch as I do, I weigh the fish in the net then deduct the weight of the net from the total weight which gives you the fish weight. That way one's not handling, damaging or stressing the fish, if you are keeping the fish then it doesn't matter. A set of forceps is a must for removing hooks from the mouth or throat of the fish, it's much easier and less damaging to the fish than using bulky pliers. Another item that you should carry is a good fold up pocket knife, handy for gutting a fish if you intend on keeping it. A Boomerang duo zinger that has a line cutter attached to it for cutting fishing line. Another item I carry is a small first aid kit, it's compact and only carries a dozen or so small to large band aids, hay fever tablets and a dozen Panamax- Panadol tablets in case of headache or some other pain that may occur. A pair of polarised sunglasses is a must when fishing, they take the glare off the water and one can see the river bottom as well as the fish. My snacks I carry in my waders pocket are usually three Cadbury's chocolate Freddo frogs or a couple of small Mars bars, my drink is a can of Pepsi Max that I have once back at the car. My fishing camera is a Canon SX620HS compact camera a small reliable quality camera that takes a great photo & video, it's a must have when fishing to take a photo of what maybe your catch of a lifetime.

    The Canon SX620IS camera, it's small & packed with plenty of punch.
     
    ** As for some of my most memorable moments, well this has really got me thinking as there's been quite a few over my 56 years of trout fishing, hopefully I can remember most of them. There's two that always come to mind, the first time I went trout fishing to the Finniss River at Yundi in my home State of South Australia back in 1966. My rod was a 6' solid fibreglass one, the spinning reel I can't remember what brand it was, the lure was a brand new Mepps #1 silver Black Fury that I bought from Adelaide Fishing Tackle, silver was the only colour available back then. On that first trip trout fishing in the Finniss River I caught my first trout on the Mepps Black Fury, a trout that weighed 3 lbs, from that day on I was hooked on trout fishing. Another memorable moment was when I used to do a lot of salt water fishing in South Australia when I caught a 36 lb snapper (gutted weight) during a night time fishing trip in my boat back in 1973. I have a lot of very good memorable moments of my fishing adventures when I lived in South Australia, too many to mention in this article.
    Here's a few memorable moments since we made the move to Tasmania back in March 2000. I remember the first trip I had on opening day was to the Dasher River and being keen to get an early start I was at the river just as the sun rose. It was a very frosty morning, in fact it was so cold as I retrieved the spinner the water that came off the line onto the rod eyelets froze up and made it impossible to retrieve the spinner, I have never fished at first light in August since that day. From there I went down to Lake Barrington where I caught my first trout of the 2000-01 trout season on a Mepps gold #1 Black Fury spinner, it was a 1.5kg brown trout.
    On the last day of the 2017/18 trout season I caught a PB brown trout in a river, it went 3.85 kgs (8lbs 8ozs) and was caught in the River Leven at Gunns Plains. On the 3rd November 2019 I caught my 10,000th Tasmanian trout, something I never thought of achieving. Another winner on the Leven River was back in 2009 when I won the World Grasshopper Championship in the Carnival of the Grasshopper, I captained the two man team that day, I also won the Lord of the River for most trout caught as well as the heaviest fish. It was back in 2006 when I joined the Ulverstone Angling Club and to my surprise the first season with them I won the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for most trout caught in rivers and streams with 437 trout being caught. Since that time I have gone on to hold the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for the past 16 years (2006-2022) in a row. So there you have it, these are just a few of many memorable moments I've had over many years of fishing. Hopefully before it comes to a time when I have to call it a day, I can add a few more memorable moments to it.

    My PB wild brown trout, 8lb 8ozs, it was released back into the river as are all of the trout I catch.
    One other thing and this isn't a most memorable moment, it's just a little something extra for you to take in if you're just starting to fish the rivers. The more often you fish a river you'll get learn a lot more about it, like pockets of flat water behind rocks in the river, narrow flat waters close to the river banks, they are all fish holding areas, so you won't bypass them like you may have done to start with, you will flick a lure into them. You'll also get to know where it's safe enough to wade, where it's safe to cross the river, most of all, remember safety must come first, it must be a priority when fishing any river. No fish is worth drowning for, so please do not take any risks while fishing in any river, stay safe & tight lines. If and when you do catch a trout, remember to always wet your hands before handling the fish that way you don't remove it's protective slimy coating. I know a lot will keep a trout for a feed and that's fine, if you're not keeping it and just want to take a photo of yourself and the fish, be careful how you hold it. Don't take a vice like grip behind it's gills because that's where the heart & liver are and you will damage them, the fish will swim off, but it will more than likely die soon after it's release. Handle the fish as short a time as possible, even more so in hot weather when river trout are under stress due to warmer water temps. If you really don't need a selfie holding a fish, take a photo of it in the landing net and release it ASAP.

    The anti kink set ups I use when spin fishing for trout with Mepps inline spinners.

    A beautifully coloured Mersey River wild rainbow trout.
    cheers
    Adrian
  2. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from Plectropomus in Adrian's Trout Kit Plus..   
    This article will hopefully be of some help to those of you who chase trout in the rivers & streams there in South Aust, the tactics I use here in Tasmania are the same that I taught myself when I started trout fishing there in the Finness, Light, Torrens, Okanparinga & Sturt Rivers as well as Sixth Creek plus a few other small streams. The only difference to back then when I first started trout fishing (mid1960's) is the tackle is way better now days..
    cheers
    Adrian
    Adrian's Trout Kit plus...
    I was asked sometime ago if I could run through my trout kit from head to toe, such as specific clothing, waders, boots, glasses, camera, drinks, snacks, rod, reel, tackle and whatever else I have for trout fishing the rivers here in Tasmania. I was also asked about some memorable moments plus a few other things that may be of interest, it's something I've never thought about really, probably something I've just taken for granted. So let's start off with the waders & boots etc...
    * The Wading gear: Seeing as I only fish rivers/streams & creeks for trout my first pair of waders were the Hornes waist waders with the Blundstone boots. They were a tough long lasting set of waders, but they were very heavy, the boots had no grip on the slippery, rocky river bottoms, after six trout seasons of using them it was time for a change. A friend told me to go for a pair of breathable waders and wading boots, so that's what I did. My first pair was a cheap ($120-00) unbranded set that I bought online, they came from China, that pair didn't get me through the first season, the neoprene foot leaked as did the welded seams. I needed a pair that would last a lot longer than that because I average 90 trips a year during the nine months of each trout season, each trip varies from 3 to 5 hours of wading a river. After quite a lot of researching some of the more expensive brands I went for the Redington, Compass & Bassdash breathable waders with the neoprene stocking feet, the reason I went for those waders was because they're all quality lightweight waders that I knew would get me through many trout seasons. They did and ten years on I'm still using those waders, actually I am now on my third pair. A friend of mine gave me a brand new pair of the cheap unbranded waders which I now use in the small streams & creeks, I do this to save the wear and tear on the more expensive waders.

    Remember, always safety first when fishing a river, even more so when it's a fast water.
    ** The wading boots, I went for were the Korkers with the interchangeable soles, sticky rubber, felt & studded felt. The soles I use on the majority of my river trips are the studded felt soles, they have excellent grip in the larger rivers that are very rocky and slippery. The plain rubber & felt soles are ideal from small streams & creeks that have small gravelly bottoms with the odd rocky sections in them, so that's my wading set up. When buying a pair of wading boots you must order them one size larger than your normal shoe size to allow for the thickness of the neoprene stocking foot, eg: your shoe size 10, wading boot size 11. The main reason I went for a quality wading boot with an interchangeable sole is because of the amount of kilometres I walk to get to & from a river which can be 2 kms to 6 kms a trip, that's not counting the distance spent in a river fishing for trout.
    ** Clothing: I'm a believer of wearing clothing that blends in with the surroundings one's fishing in. Most of the rivers/streams & creeks I fish have fairly dense foliage on both sides of them, so the majority of my clothing is dark green & khaki coloured items. If I'm heading to the more open larger rivers and the grass covered river banks have dried off then I'll wear a beige coloured outfit. When chasing trout in clear waters on sunny days a dark colour will stand out in an open river, that will spook a trout in no time at all. If possible stay as close to the side of the river that has dense foliage on it. I have seen a trout sitting in clear open water and a small wagtail had flown over, the small shadow of that small bird was enough to spook it. Actually I prefer fishing in dull heavy overcast humid weather conditions with very light drizzle, one can wear the dark or lighter colours in these conditions. 

    Spin fishing the Mersey River in full wading gear.
    ** Fishing vests: I have a few of these, both in green/khaki, camouflage and light brown/beige, all have plenty of pockets for the many small lure boxes I carry. They are short vests as well, there's nothing worse than wearing a long vest and getting them wet when fishing in waist deep water. Not only that, the pockets that hold the lure boxes in a long vest fill up with water, this I found out from experience.
    ** Rods: The rods I use are Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3 kg, 6', 6'6'' & 7' lengths, these are a beautiful light weight well balanced spin rods, perfect for what I require when chasing trout in the rivers and streams. I can fish for 4 to 5 hours covering anything from 1.5 kms to 3 kms without getting tired in the shoulders which is a real benefit when spin fishing rivers, how many casts and retrieves I would have over that time & distance would be in the high hundreds I would imagine.

    Okuma Celilo Finnese 6'6'' ULS 1-3kg trout rod, Okuma Helios HSX-20 spinning reel, a well balanced set up.

    One of the rewards of small stream fishing.
    ** Reels: All reels used are Okuma spinning reels, the models are as follows: Okuma ITX-1000, Okuma Inspira ISX-20B, Okuma Helios HSX-20, Epixor EXPT-20 & Okuma Ceymar C-10 spinning reels, these spinning reels are nice lightweight spinning reels that are well suited to the Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3kg (2-6lb) spin rods.
    ** Fishing lines: There's only one brand I use and have done so for many years, it's the Australian made & owned Platypus line which has come a long way since I first used it back in the 60's. The Super 100 UHT & Pulse Mono 4lb/6lb monofilament are the main ones I use in the clear & brown colour. The other Platypus line used is the Pretest Premium Grade 4lb monofilament, the 6lb leader is the Platypus Stealth FC 100% fluorocarbon line.
     

    A nice mix of lures used for the larger rivers.
    ** Lures: It's Mepps, Mepps & more Mepps inline spinners that I have in my small lures boxes, they range from the smallest & lightest starting with the #00 (0.9gms) Steamepps (black, gold, silver blades) #00 (1.5gm) Black Fury (black, gold, copper blades), Aglia ( Plain, Mouche Noire, Aglia Mouche Rouge in black, gold, copper blades), Bug spinners (Stone Fly, March Brown, White Miller & Cherry), Comet (silver, gold blades). These small lightweight spinners are ideal for shallow small streams/rivers as well as some of the larger rivers I fish. Next are the size #0 (2.5gm) & #1 (3.5gm) inline spinners same models & blade colours as above but with a few different models included such as the Aglia Fluo tiger, rainbo, brown & phospho colours, Aglia Furia, Aglia TW & TW Streamer. So as you can see I do carry a large variety of Mepps inline spinners, all of which I have caught trout on. I also carry several small hard body lures that get used on the trout when they are not in the mood to take the Mepps inline spinners which isn't all that often because 98% of my trout are caught on the Mepps spinners. The hard body lures are mostly in the 30mm to 60mm size, floating & suspending models, Pontoon 21, Daiwa, Atomic Hardz, Goldy minnow, & Rapala lure are just some of hard bodies I have on hand. I also carry a few Ghost & Switchblade lures as well, there's nothing better than having a good mix of lures when trout fishing rivers & streams.

    A good mix of lures etc that I use in the rivers/streams.
    ** Other items that I have with me when trout fishing the rivers: One of the main items is a landing net, the ones I used are all wooden framed with a soft plastic mesh that doesn't damage the fish. The good thing about using a wooden landing net is that it floats and I have mine attached to my vest with a two meter alligator strap. That way if I drop it while fast water fishing it floats and I just pull it back in with the strap. Other items I carry in the vest are: Small plastic containers with snap swivels, anti-kinks in it in case for some reason the main line breaks, you'll need them for replacement of the lost anti-kink set up. Small sharpening stone to keep the lure hooks sharps at all times, a small pair of pointed nose pliers that are used to pull a treble hook from a finger or hand, accidents do happen when handling a fish, it's quite easy to have the lure fly from the fish and lob in the finger or hand when it tosses the spinner/lure. Also one can get a hook in the hand when trying to take hold of a fish that's playing up in the net, the pliers are ideal for when you need to remove the hook. The pliers are also used for setting the treble hooks off center, I'm not a fan of straight trebles.

    My fishing vest set up.
     
    Digital scales are essential if you wish to weigh your catch as I do, I weigh the fish in the net then deduct the weight of the net from the total weight which gives you the fish weight. That way one's not handling, damaging or stressing the fish, if you are keeping the fish then it doesn't matter. A set of forceps is a must for removing hooks from the mouth or throat of the fish, it's much easier and less damaging to the fish than using bulky pliers. Another item that you should carry is a good fold up pocket knife, handy for gutting a fish if you intend on keeping it. A Boomerang duo zinger that has a line cutter attached to it for cutting fishing line. Another item I carry is a small first aid kit, it's compact and only carries a dozen or so small to large band aids, hay fever tablets and a dozen Panamax- Panadol tablets in case of headache or some other pain that may occur. A pair of polarised sunglasses is a must when fishing, they take the glare off the water and one can see the river bottom as well as the fish. My snacks I carry in my waders pocket are usually three Cadbury's chocolate Freddo frogs or a couple of small Mars bars, my drink is a can of Pepsi Max that I have once back at the car. My fishing camera is a Canon SX620HS compact camera a small reliable quality camera that takes a great photo & video, it's a must have when fishing to take a photo of what maybe your catch of a lifetime.

    The Canon SX620IS camera, it's small & packed with plenty of punch.
     
    ** As for some of my most memorable moments, well this has really got me thinking as there's been quite a few over my 56 years of trout fishing, hopefully I can remember most of them. There's two that always come to mind, the first time I went trout fishing to the Finniss River at Yundi in my home State of South Australia back in 1966. My rod was a 6' solid fibreglass one, the spinning reel I can't remember what brand it was, the lure was a brand new Mepps #1 silver Black Fury that I bought from Adelaide Fishing Tackle, silver was the only colour available back then. On that first trip trout fishing in the Finniss River I caught my first trout on the Mepps Black Fury, a trout that weighed 3 lbs, from that day on I was hooked on trout fishing. Another memorable moment was when I used to do a lot of salt water fishing in South Australia when I caught a 36 lb snapper (gutted weight) during a night time fishing trip in my boat back in 1973. I have a lot of very good memorable moments of my fishing adventures when I lived in South Australia, too many to mention in this article.
    Here's a few memorable moments since we made the move to Tasmania back in March 2000. I remember the first trip I had on opening day was to the Dasher River and being keen to get an early start I was at the river just as the sun rose. It was a very frosty morning, in fact it was so cold as I retrieved the spinner the water that came off the line onto the rod eyelets froze up and made it impossible to retrieve the spinner, I have never fished at first light in August since that day. From there I went down to Lake Barrington where I caught my first trout of the 2000-01 trout season on a Mepps gold #1 Black Fury spinner, it was a 1.5kg brown trout.
    On the last day of the 2017/18 trout season I caught a PB brown trout in a river, it went 3.85 kgs (8lbs 8ozs) and was caught in the River Leven at Gunns Plains. On the 3rd November 2019 I caught my 10,000th Tasmanian trout, something I never thought of achieving. Another winner on the Leven River was back in 2009 when I won the World Grasshopper Championship in the Carnival of the Grasshopper, I captained the two man team that day, I also won the Lord of the River for most trout caught as well as the heaviest fish. It was back in 2006 when I joined the Ulverstone Angling Club and to my surprise the first season with them I won the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for most trout caught in rivers and streams with 437 trout being caught. Since that time I have gone on to hold the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for the past 16 years (2006-2022) in a row. So there you have it, these are just a few of many memorable moments I've had over many years of fishing. Hopefully before it comes to a time when I have to call it a day, I can add a few more memorable moments to it.

    My PB wild brown trout, 8lb 8ozs, it was released back into the river as are all of the trout I catch.
    One other thing and this isn't a most memorable moment, it's just a little something extra for you to take in if you're just starting to fish the rivers. The more often you fish a river you'll get learn a lot more about it, like pockets of flat water behind rocks in the river, narrow flat waters close to the river banks, they are all fish holding areas, so you won't bypass them like you may have done to start with, you will flick a lure into them. You'll also get to know where it's safe enough to wade, where it's safe to cross the river, most of all, remember safety must come first, it must be a priority when fishing any river. No fish is worth drowning for, so please do not take any risks while fishing in any river, stay safe & tight lines. If and when you do catch a trout, remember to always wet your hands before handling the fish that way you don't remove it's protective slimy coating. I know a lot will keep a trout for a feed and that's fine, if you're not keeping it and just want to take a photo of yourself and the fish, be careful how you hold it. Don't take a vice like grip behind it's gills because that's where the heart & liver are and you will damage them, the fish will swim off, but it will more than likely die soon after it's release. Handle the fish as short a time as possible, even more so in hot weather when river trout are under stress due to warmer water temps. If you really don't need a selfie holding a fish, take a photo of it in the landing net and release it ASAP.

    The anti kink set ups I use when spin fishing for trout with Mepps inline spinners.

    A beautifully coloured Mersey River wild rainbow trout.
    cheers
    Adrian
  3. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from HB tragic in Adrian's Trout Kit Plus..   
    This article will hopefully be of some help to those of you who chase trout in the rivers & streams there in South Aust, the tactics I use here in Tasmania are the same that I taught myself when I started trout fishing there in the Finness, Light, Torrens, Okanparinga & Sturt Rivers as well as Sixth Creek plus a few other small streams. The only difference to back then when I first started trout fishing (mid1960's) is the tackle is way better now days..
    cheers
    Adrian
    Adrian's Trout Kit plus...
    I was asked sometime ago if I could run through my trout kit from head to toe, such as specific clothing, waders, boots, glasses, camera, drinks, snacks, rod, reel, tackle and whatever else I have for trout fishing the rivers here in Tasmania. I was also asked about some memorable moments plus a few other things that may be of interest, it's something I've never thought about really, probably something I've just taken for granted. So let's start off with the waders & boots etc...
    * The Wading gear: Seeing as I only fish rivers/streams & creeks for trout my first pair of waders were the Hornes waist waders with the Blundstone boots. They were a tough long lasting set of waders, but they were very heavy, the boots had no grip on the slippery, rocky river bottoms, after six trout seasons of using them it was time for a change. A friend told me to go for a pair of breathable waders and wading boots, so that's what I did. My first pair was a cheap ($120-00) unbranded set that I bought online, they came from China, that pair didn't get me through the first season, the neoprene foot leaked as did the welded seams. I needed a pair that would last a lot longer than that because I average 90 trips a year during the nine months of each trout season, each trip varies from 3 to 5 hours of wading a river. After quite a lot of researching some of the more expensive brands I went for the Redington, Compass & Bassdash breathable waders with the neoprene stocking feet, the reason I went for those waders was because they're all quality lightweight waders that I knew would get me through many trout seasons. They did and ten years on I'm still using those waders, actually I am now on my third pair. A friend of mine gave me a brand new pair of the cheap unbranded waders which I now use in the small streams & creeks, I do this to save the wear and tear on the more expensive waders.

    Remember, always safety first when fishing a river, even more so when it's a fast water.
    ** The wading boots, I went for were the Korkers with the interchangeable soles, sticky rubber, felt & studded felt. The soles I use on the majority of my river trips are the studded felt soles, they have excellent grip in the larger rivers that are very rocky and slippery. The plain rubber & felt soles are ideal from small streams & creeks that have small gravelly bottoms with the odd rocky sections in them, so that's my wading set up. When buying a pair of wading boots you must order them one size larger than your normal shoe size to allow for the thickness of the neoprene stocking foot, eg: your shoe size 10, wading boot size 11. The main reason I went for a quality wading boot with an interchangeable sole is because of the amount of kilometres I walk to get to & from a river which can be 2 kms to 6 kms a trip, that's not counting the distance spent in a river fishing for trout.
    ** Clothing: I'm a believer of wearing clothing that blends in with the surroundings one's fishing in. Most of the rivers/streams & creeks I fish have fairly dense foliage on both sides of them, so the majority of my clothing is dark green & khaki coloured items. If I'm heading to the more open larger rivers and the grass covered river banks have dried off then I'll wear a beige coloured outfit. When chasing trout in clear waters on sunny days a dark colour will stand out in an open river, that will spook a trout in no time at all. If possible stay as close to the side of the river that has dense foliage on it. I have seen a trout sitting in clear open water and a small wagtail had flown over, the small shadow of that small bird was enough to spook it. Actually I prefer fishing in dull heavy overcast humid weather conditions with very light drizzle, one can wear the dark or lighter colours in these conditions. 

    Spin fishing the Mersey River in full wading gear.
    ** Fishing vests: I have a few of these, both in green/khaki, camouflage and light brown/beige, all have plenty of pockets for the many small lure boxes I carry. They are short vests as well, there's nothing worse than wearing a long vest and getting them wet when fishing in waist deep water. Not only that, the pockets that hold the lure boxes in a long vest fill up with water, this I found out from experience.
    ** Rods: The rods I use are Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3 kg, 6', 6'6'' & 7' lengths, these are a beautiful light weight well balanced spin rods, perfect for what I require when chasing trout in the rivers and streams. I can fish for 4 to 5 hours covering anything from 1.5 kms to 3 kms without getting tired in the shoulders which is a real benefit when spin fishing rivers, how many casts and retrieves I would have over that time & distance would be in the high hundreds I would imagine.

    Okuma Celilo Finnese 6'6'' ULS 1-3kg trout rod, Okuma Helios HSX-20 spinning reel, a well balanced set up.

    One of the rewards of small stream fishing.
    ** Reels: All reels used are Okuma spinning reels, the models are as follows: Okuma ITX-1000, Okuma Inspira ISX-20B, Okuma Helios HSX-20, Epixor EXPT-20 & Okuma Ceymar C-10 spinning reels, these spinning reels are nice lightweight spinning reels that are well suited to the Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3kg (2-6lb) spin rods.
    ** Fishing lines: There's only one brand I use and have done so for many years, it's the Australian made & owned Platypus line which has come a long way since I first used it back in the 60's. The Super 100 UHT & Pulse Mono 4lb/6lb monofilament are the main ones I use in the clear & brown colour. The other Platypus line used is the Pretest Premium Grade 4lb monofilament, the 6lb leader is the Platypus Stealth FC 100% fluorocarbon line.
     

    A nice mix of lures used for the larger rivers.
    ** Lures: It's Mepps, Mepps & more Mepps inline spinners that I have in my small lures boxes, they range from the smallest & lightest starting with the #00 (0.9gms) Steamepps (black, gold, silver blades) #00 (1.5gm) Black Fury (black, gold, copper blades), Aglia ( Plain, Mouche Noire, Aglia Mouche Rouge in black, gold, copper blades), Bug spinners (Stone Fly, March Brown, White Miller & Cherry), Comet (silver, gold blades). These small lightweight spinners are ideal for shallow small streams/rivers as well as some of the larger rivers I fish. Next are the size #0 (2.5gm) & #1 (3.5gm) inline spinners same models & blade colours as above but with a few different models included such as the Aglia Fluo tiger, rainbo, brown & phospho colours, Aglia Furia, Aglia TW & TW Streamer. So as you can see I do carry a large variety of Mepps inline spinners, all of which I have caught trout on. I also carry several small hard body lures that get used on the trout when they are not in the mood to take the Mepps inline spinners which isn't all that often because 98% of my trout are caught on the Mepps spinners. The hard body lures are mostly in the 30mm to 60mm size, floating & suspending models, Pontoon 21, Daiwa, Atomic Hardz, Goldy minnow, & Rapala lure are just some of hard bodies I have on hand. I also carry a few Ghost & Switchblade lures as well, there's nothing better than having a good mix of lures when trout fishing rivers & streams.

    A good mix of lures etc that I use in the rivers/streams.
    ** Other items that I have with me when trout fishing the rivers: One of the main items is a landing net, the ones I used are all wooden framed with a soft plastic mesh that doesn't damage the fish. The good thing about using a wooden landing net is that it floats and I have mine attached to my vest with a two meter alligator strap. That way if I drop it while fast water fishing it floats and I just pull it back in with the strap. Other items I carry in the vest are: Small plastic containers with snap swivels, anti-kinks in it in case for some reason the main line breaks, you'll need them for replacement of the lost anti-kink set up. Small sharpening stone to keep the lure hooks sharps at all times, a small pair of pointed nose pliers that are used to pull a treble hook from a finger or hand, accidents do happen when handling a fish, it's quite easy to have the lure fly from the fish and lob in the finger or hand when it tosses the spinner/lure. Also one can get a hook in the hand when trying to take hold of a fish that's playing up in the net, the pliers are ideal for when you need to remove the hook. The pliers are also used for setting the treble hooks off center, I'm not a fan of straight trebles.

    My fishing vest set up.
     
    Digital scales are essential if you wish to weigh your catch as I do, I weigh the fish in the net then deduct the weight of the net from the total weight which gives you the fish weight. That way one's not handling, damaging or stressing the fish, if you are keeping the fish then it doesn't matter. A set of forceps is a must for removing hooks from the mouth or throat of the fish, it's much easier and less damaging to the fish than using bulky pliers. Another item that you should carry is a good fold up pocket knife, handy for gutting a fish if you intend on keeping it. A Boomerang duo zinger that has a line cutter attached to it for cutting fishing line. Another item I carry is a small first aid kit, it's compact and only carries a dozen or so small to large band aids, hay fever tablets and a dozen Panamax- Panadol tablets in case of headache or some other pain that may occur. A pair of polarised sunglasses is a must when fishing, they take the glare off the water and one can see the river bottom as well as the fish. My snacks I carry in my waders pocket are usually three Cadbury's chocolate Freddo frogs or a couple of small Mars bars, my drink is a can of Pepsi Max that I have once back at the car. My fishing camera is a Canon SX620HS compact camera a small reliable quality camera that takes a great photo & video, it's a must have when fishing to take a photo of what maybe your catch of a lifetime.

    The Canon SX620IS camera, it's small & packed with plenty of punch.
     
    ** As for some of my most memorable moments, well this has really got me thinking as there's been quite a few over my 56 years of trout fishing, hopefully I can remember most of them. There's two that always come to mind, the first time I went trout fishing to the Finniss River at Yundi in my home State of South Australia back in 1966. My rod was a 6' solid fibreglass one, the spinning reel I can't remember what brand it was, the lure was a brand new Mepps #1 silver Black Fury that I bought from Adelaide Fishing Tackle, silver was the only colour available back then. On that first trip trout fishing in the Finniss River I caught my first trout on the Mepps Black Fury, a trout that weighed 3 lbs, from that day on I was hooked on trout fishing. Another memorable moment was when I used to do a lot of salt water fishing in South Australia when I caught a 36 lb snapper (gutted weight) during a night time fishing trip in my boat back in 1973. I have a lot of very good memorable moments of my fishing adventures when I lived in South Australia, too many to mention in this article.
    Here's a few memorable moments since we made the move to Tasmania back in March 2000. I remember the first trip I had on opening day was to the Dasher River and being keen to get an early start I was at the river just as the sun rose. It was a very frosty morning, in fact it was so cold as I retrieved the spinner the water that came off the line onto the rod eyelets froze up and made it impossible to retrieve the spinner, I have never fished at first light in August since that day. From there I went down to Lake Barrington where I caught my first trout of the 2000-01 trout season on a Mepps gold #1 Black Fury spinner, it was a 1.5kg brown trout.
    On the last day of the 2017/18 trout season I caught a PB brown trout in a river, it went 3.85 kgs (8lbs 8ozs) and was caught in the River Leven at Gunns Plains. On the 3rd November 2019 I caught my 10,000th Tasmanian trout, something I never thought of achieving. Another winner on the Leven River was back in 2009 when I won the World Grasshopper Championship in the Carnival of the Grasshopper, I captained the two man team that day, I also won the Lord of the River for most trout caught as well as the heaviest fish. It was back in 2006 when I joined the Ulverstone Angling Club and to my surprise the first season with them I won the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for most trout caught in rivers and streams with 437 trout being caught. Since that time I have gone on to hold the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for the past 16 years (2006-2022) in a row. So there you have it, these are just a few of many memorable moments I've had over many years of fishing. Hopefully before it comes to a time when I have to call it a day, I can add a few more memorable moments to it.

    My PB wild brown trout, 8lb 8ozs, it was released back into the river as are all of the trout I catch.
    One other thing and this isn't a most memorable moment, it's just a little something extra for you to take in if you're just starting to fish the rivers. The more often you fish a river you'll get learn a lot more about it, like pockets of flat water behind rocks in the river, narrow flat waters close to the river banks, they are all fish holding areas, so you won't bypass them like you may have done to start with, you will flick a lure into them. You'll also get to know where it's safe enough to wade, where it's safe to cross the river, most of all, remember safety must come first, it must be a priority when fishing any river. No fish is worth drowning for, so please do not take any risks while fishing in any river, stay safe & tight lines. If and when you do catch a trout, remember to always wet your hands before handling the fish that way you don't remove it's protective slimy coating. I know a lot will keep a trout for a feed and that's fine, if you're not keeping it and just want to take a photo of yourself and the fish, be careful how you hold it. Don't take a vice like grip behind it's gills because that's where the heart & liver are and you will damage them, the fish will swim off, but it will more than likely die soon after it's release. Handle the fish as short a time as possible, even more so in hot weather when river trout are under stress due to warmer water temps. If you really don't need a selfie holding a fish, take a photo of it in the landing net and release it ASAP.

    The anti kink set ups I use when spin fishing for trout with Mepps inline spinners.

    A beautifully coloured Mersey River wild rainbow trout.
    cheers
    Adrian
  4. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from doobie in Adrian's Trout Kit Plus..   
    This article will hopefully be of some help to those of you who chase trout in the rivers & streams there in South Aust, the tactics I use here in Tasmania are the same that I taught myself when I started trout fishing there in the Finness, Light, Torrens, Okanparinga & Sturt Rivers as well as Sixth Creek plus a few other small streams. The only difference to back then when I first started trout fishing (mid1960's) is the tackle is way better now days..
    cheers
    Adrian
    Adrian's Trout Kit plus...
    I was asked sometime ago if I could run through my trout kit from head to toe, such as specific clothing, waders, boots, glasses, camera, drinks, snacks, rod, reel, tackle and whatever else I have for trout fishing the rivers here in Tasmania. I was also asked about some memorable moments plus a few other things that may be of interest, it's something I've never thought about really, probably something I've just taken for granted. So let's start off with the waders & boots etc...
    * The Wading gear: Seeing as I only fish rivers/streams & creeks for trout my first pair of waders were the Hornes waist waders with the Blundstone boots. They were a tough long lasting set of waders, but they were very heavy, the boots had no grip on the slippery, rocky river bottoms, after six trout seasons of using them it was time for a change. A friend told me to go for a pair of breathable waders and wading boots, so that's what I did. My first pair was a cheap ($120-00) unbranded set that I bought online, they came from China, that pair didn't get me through the first season, the neoprene foot leaked as did the welded seams. I needed a pair that would last a lot longer than that because I average 90 trips a year during the nine months of each trout season, each trip varies from 3 to 5 hours of wading a river. After quite a lot of researching some of the more expensive brands I went for the Redington, Compass & Bassdash breathable waders with the neoprene stocking feet, the reason I went for those waders was because they're all quality lightweight waders that I knew would get me through many trout seasons. They did and ten years on I'm still using those waders, actually I am now on my third pair. A friend of mine gave me a brand new pair of the cheap unbranded waders which I now use in the small streams & creeks, I do this to save the wear and tear on the more expensive waders.

    Remember, always safety first when fishing a river, even more so when it's a fast water.
    ** The wading boots, I went for were the Korkers with the interchangeable soles, sticky rubber, felt & studded felt. The soles I use on the majority of my river trips are the studded felt soles, they have excellent grip in the larger rivers that are very rocky and slippery. The plain rubber & felt soles are ideal from small streams & creeks that have small gravelly bottoms with the odd rocky sections in them, so that's my wading set up. When buying a pair of wading boots you must order them one size larger than your normal shoe size to allow for the thickness of the neoprene stocking foot, eg: your shoe size 10, wading boot size 11. The main reason I went for a quality wading boot with an interchangeable sole is because of the amount of kilometres I walk to get to & from a river which can be 2 kms to 6 kms a trip, that's not counting the distance spent in a river fishing for trout.
    ** Clothing: I'm a believer of wearing clothing that blends in with the surroundings one's fishing in. Most of the rivers/streams & creeks I fish have fairly dense foliage on both sides of them, so the majority of my clothing is dark green & khaki coloured items. If I'm heading to the more open larger rivers and the grass covered river banks have dried off then I'll wear a beige coloured outfit. When chasing trout in clear waters on sunny days a dark colour will stand out in an open river, that will spook a trout in no time at all. If possible stay as close to the side of the river that has dense foliage on it. I have seen a trout sitting in clear open water and a small wagtail had flown over, the small shadow of that small bird was enough to spook it. Actually I prefer fishing in dull heavy overcast humid weather conditions with very light drizzle, one can wear the dark or lighter colours in these conditions. 

    Spin fishing the Mersey River in full wading gear.
    ** Fishing vests: I have a few of these, both in green/khaki, camouflage and light brown/beige, all have plenty of pockets for the many small lure boxes I carry. They are short vests as well, there's nothing worse than wearing a long vest and getting them wet when fishing in waist deep water. Not only that, the pockets that hold the lure boxes in a long vest fill up with water, this I found out from experience.
    ** Rods: The rods I use are Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3 kg, 6', 6'6'' & 7' lengths, these are a beautiful light weight well balanced spin rods, perfect for what I require when chasing trout in the rivers and streams. I can fish for 4 to 5 hours covering anything from 1.5 kms to 3 kms without getting tired in the shoulders which is a real benefit when spin fishing rivers, how many casts and retrieves I would have over that time & distance would be in the high hundreds I would imagine.

    Okuma Celilo Finnese 6'6'' ULS 1-3kg trout rod, Okuma Helios HSX-20 spinning reel, a well balanced set up.

    One of the rewards of small stream fishing.
    ** Reels: All reels used are Okuma spinning reels, the models are as follows: Okuma ITX-1000, Okuma Inspira ISX-20B, Okuma Helios HSX-20, Epixor EXPT-20 & Okuma Ceymar C-10 spinning reels, these spinning reels are nice lightweight spinning reels that are well suited to the Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3kg (2-6lb) spin rods.
    ** Fishing lines: There's only one brand I use and have done so for many years, it's the Australian made & owned Platypus line which has come a long way since I first used it back in the 60's. The Super 100 UHT & Pulse Mono 4lb/6lb monofilament are the main ones I use in the clear & brown colour. The other Platypus line used is the Pretest Premium Grade 4lb monofilament, the 6lb leader is the Platypus Stealth FC 100% fluorocarbon line.
     

    A nice mix of lures used for the larger rivers.
    ** Lures: It's Mepps, Mepps & more Mepps inline spinners that I have in my small lures boxes, they range from the smallest & lightest starting with the #00 (0.9gms) Steamepps (black, gold, silver blades) #00 (1.5gm) Black Fury (black, gold, copper blades), Aglia ( Plain, Mouche Noire, Aglia Mouche Rouge in black, gold, copper blades), Bug spinners (Stone Fly, March Brown, White Miller & Cherry), Comet (silver, gold blades). These small lightweight spinners are ideal for shallow small streams/rivers as well as some of the larger rivers I fish. Next are the size #0 (2.5gm) & #1 (3.5gm) inline spinners same models & blade colours as above but with a few different models included such as the Aglia Fluo tiger, rainbo, brown & phospho colours, Aglia Furia, Aglia TW & TW Streamer. So as you can see I do carry a large variety of Mepps inline spinners, all of which I have caught trout on. I also carry several small hard body lures that get used on the trout when they are not in the mood to take the Mepps inline spinners which isn't all that often because 98% of my trout are caught on the Mepps spinners. The hard body lures are mostly in the 30mm to 60mm size, floating & suspending models, Pontoon 21, Daiwa, Atomic Hardz, Goldy minnow, & Rapala lure are just some of hard bodies I have on hand. I also carry a few Ghost & Switchblade lures as well, there's nothing better than having a good mix of lures when trout fishing rivers & streams.

    A good mix of lures etc that I use in the rivers/streams.
    ** Other items that I have with me when trout fishing the rivers: One of the main items is a landing net, the ones I used are all wooden framed with a soft plastic mesh that doesn't damage the fish. The good thing about using a wooden landing net is that it floats and I have mine attached to my vest with a two meter alligator strap. That way if I drop it while fast water fishing it floats and I just pull it back in with the strap. Other items I carry in the vest are: Small plastic containers with snap swivels, anti-kinks in it in case for some reason the main line breaks, you'll need them for replacement of the lost anti-kink set up. Small sharpening stone to keep the lure hooks sharps at all times, a small pair of pointed nose pliers that are used to pull a treble hook from a finger or hand, accidents do happen when handling a fish, it's quite easy to have the lure fly from the fish and lob in the finger or hand when it tosses the spinner/lure. Also one can get a hook in the hand when trying to take hold of a fish that's playing up in the net, the pliers are ideal for when you need to remove the hook. The pliers are also used for setting the treble hooks off center, I'm not a fan of straight trebles.

    My fishing vest set up.
     
    Digital scales are essential if you wish to weigh your catch as I do, I weigh the fish in the net then deduct the weight of the net from the total weight which gives you the fish weight. That way one's not handling, damaging or stressing the fish, if you are keeping the fish then it doesn't matter. A set of forceps is a must for removing hooks from the mouth or throat of the fish, it's much easier and less damaging to the fish than using bulky pliers. Another item that you should carry is a good fold up pocket knife, handy for gutting a fish if you intend on keeping it. A Boomerang duo zinger that has a line cutter attached to it for cutting fishing line. Another item I carry is a small first aid kit, it's compact and only carries a dozen or so small to large band aids, hay fever tablets and a dozen Panamax- Panadol tablets in case of headache or some other pain that may occur. A pair of polarised sunglasses is a must when fishing, they take the glare off the water and one can see the river bottom as well as the fish. My snacks I carry in my waders pocket are usually three Cadbury's chocolate Freddo frogs or a couple of small Mars bars, my drink is a can of Pepsi Max that I have once back at the car. My fishing camera is a Canon SX620HS compact camera a small reliable quality camera that takes a great photo & video, it's a must have when fishing to take a photo of what maybe your catch of a lifetime.

    The Canon SX620IS camera, it's small & packed with plenty of punch.
     
    ** As for some of my most memorable moments, well this has really got me thinking as there's been quite a few over my 56 years of trout fishing, hopefully I can remember most of them. There's two that always come to mind, the first time I went trout fishing to the Finniss River at Yundi in my home State of South Australia back in 1966. My rod was a 6' solid fibreglass one, the spinning reel I can't remember what brand it was, the lure was a brand new Mepps #1 silver Black Fury that I bought from Adelaide Fishing Tackle, silver was the only colour available back then. On that first trip trout fishing in the Finniss River I caught my first trout on the Mepps Black Fury, a trout that weighed 3 lbs, from that day on I was hooked on trout fishing. Another memorable moment was when I used to do a lot of salt water fishing in South Australia when I caught a 36 lb snapper (gutted weight) during a night time fishing trip in my boat back in 1973. I have a lot of very good memorable moments of my fishing adventures when I lived in South Australia, too many to mention in this article.
    Here's a few memorable moments since we made the move to Tasmania back in March 2000. I remember the first trip I had on opening day was to the Dasher River and being keen to get an early start I was at the river just as the sun rose. It was a very frosty morning, in fact it was so cold as I retrieved the spinner the water that came off the line onto the rod eyelets froze up and made it impossible to retrieve the spinner, I have never fished at first light in August since that day. From there I went down to Lake Barrington where I caught my first trout of the 2000-01 trout season on a Mepps gold #1 Black Fury spinner, it was a 1.5kg brown trout.
    On the last day of the 2017/18 trout season I caught a PB brown trout in a river, it went 3.85 kgs (8lbs 8ozs) and was caught in the River Leven at Gunns Plains. On the 3rd November 2019 I caught my 10,000th Tasmanian trout, something I never thought of achieving. Another winner on the Leven River was back in 2009 when I won the World Grasshopper Championship in the Carnival of the Grasshopper, I captained the two man team that day, I also won the Lord of the River for most trout caught as well as the heaviest fish. It was back in 2006 when I joined the Ulverstone Angling Club and to my surprise the first season with them I won the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for most trout caught in rivers and streams with 437 trout being caught. Since that time I have gone on to hold the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for the past 16 years (2006-2022) in a row. So there you have it, these are just a few of many memorable moments I've had over many years of fishing. Hopefully before it comes to a time when I have to call it a day, I can add a few more memorable moments to it.

    My PB wild brown trout, 8lb 8ozs, it was released back into the river as are all of the trout I catch.
    One other thing and this isn't a most memorable moment, it's just a little something extra for you to take in if you're just starting to fish the rivers. The more often you fish a river you'll get learn a lot more about it, like pockets of flat water behind rocks in the river, narrow flat waters close to the river banks, they are all fish holding areas, so you won't bypass them like you may have done to start with, you will flick a lure into them. You'll also get to know where it's safe enough to wade, where it's safe to cross the river, most of all, remember safety must come first, it must be a priority when fishing any river. No fish is worth drowning for, so please do not take any risks while fishing in any river, stay safe & tight lines. If and when you do catch a trout, remember to always wet your hands before handling the fish that way you don't remove it's protective slimy coating. I know a lot will keep a trout for a feed and that's fine, if you're not keeping it and just want to take a photo of yourself and the fish, be careful how you hold it. Don't take a vice like grip behind it's gills because that's where the heart & liver are and you will damage them, the fish will swim off, but it will more than likely die soon after it's release. Handle the fish as short a time as possible, even more so in hot weather when river trout are under stress due to warmer water temps. If you really don't need a selfie holding a fish, take a photo of it in the landing net and release it ASAP.

    The anti kink set ups I use when spin fishing for trout with Mepps inline spinners.

    A beautifully coloured Mersey River wild rainbow trout.
    cheers
    Adrian
  5. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from Yorky in Adrian's Trout Kit Plus..   
    This article will hopefully be of some help to those of you who chase trout in the rivers & streams there in South Aust, the tactics I use here in Tasmania are the same that I taught myself when I started trout fishing there in the Finness, Light, Torrens, Okanparinga & Sturt Rivers as well as Sixth Creek plus a few other small streams. The only difference to back then when I first started trout fishing (mid1960's) is the tackle is way better now days..
    cheers
    Adrian
    Adrian's Trout Kit plus...
    I was asked sometime ago if I could run through my trout kit from head to toe, such as specific clothing, waders, boots, glasses, camera, drinks, snacks, rod, reel, tackle and whatever else I have for trout fishing the rivers here in Tasmania. I was also asked about some memorable moments plus a few other things that may be of interest, it's something I've never thought about really, probably something I've just taken for granted. So let's start off with the waders & boots etc...
    * The Wading gear: Seeing as I only fish rivers/streams & creeks for trout my first pair of waders were the Hornes waist waders with the Blundstone boots. They were a tough long lasting set of waders, but they were very heavy, the boots had no grip on the slippery, rocky river bottoms, after six trout seasons of using them it was time for a change. A friend told me to go for a pair of breathable waders and wading boots, so that's what I did. My first pair was a cheap ($120-00) unbranded set that I bought online, they came from China, that pair didn't get me through the first season, the neoprene foot leaked as did the welded seams. I needed a pair that would last a lot longer than that because I average 90 trips a year during the nine months of each trout season, each trip varies from 3 to 5 hours of wading a river. After quite a lot of researching some of the more expensive brands I went for the Redington, Compass & Bassdash breathable waders with the neoprene stocking feet, the reason I went for those waders was because they're all quality lightweight waders that I knew would get me through many trout seasons. They did and ten years on I'm still using those waders, actually I am now on my third pair. A friend of mine gave me a brand new pair of the cheap unbranded waders which I now use in the small streams & creeks, I do this to save the wear and tear on the more expensive waders.

    Remember, always safety first when fishing a river, even more so when it's a fast water.
    ** The wading boots, I went for were the Korkers with the interchangeable soles, sticky rubber, felt & studded felt. The soles I use on the majority of my river trips are the studded felt soles, they have excellent grip in the larger rivers that are very rocky and slippery. The plain rubber & felt soles are ideal from small streams & creeks that have small gravelly bottoms with the odd rocky sections in them, so that's my wading set up. When buying a pair of wading boots you must order them one size larger than your normal shoe size to allow for the thickness of the neoprene stocking foot, eg: your shoe size 10, wading boot size 11. The main reason I went for a quality wading boot with an interchangeable sole is because of the amount of kilometres I walk to get to & from a river which can be 2 kms to 6 kms a trip, that's not counting the distance spent in a river fishing for trout.
    ** Clothing: I'm a believer of wearing clothing that blends in with the surroundings one's fishing in. Most of the rivers/streams & creeks I fish have fairly dense foliage on both sides of them, so the majority of my clothing is dark green & khaki coloured items. If I'm heading to the more open larger rivers and the grass covered river banks have dried off then I'll wear a beige coloured outfit. When chasing trout in clear waters on sunny days a dark colour will stand out in an open river, that will spook a trout in no time at all. If possible stay as close to the side of the river that has dense foliage on it. I have seen a trout sitting in clear open water and a small wagtail had flown over, the small shadow of that small bird was enough to spook it. Actually I prefer fishing in dull heavy overcast humid weather conditions with very light drizzle, one can wear the dark or lighter colours in these conditions. 

    Spin fishing the Mersey River in full wading gear.
    ** Fishing vests: I have a few of these, both in green/khaki, camouflage and light brown/beige, all have plenty of pockets for the many small lure boxes I carry. They are short vests as well, there's nothing worse than wearing a long vest and getting them wet when fishing in waist deep water. Not only that, the pockets that hold the lure boxes in a long vest fill up with water, this I found out from experience.
    ** Rods: The rods I use are Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3 kg, 6', 6'6'' & 7' lengths, these are a beautiful light weight well balanced spin rods, perfect for what I require when chasing trout in the rivers and streams. I can fish for 4 to 5 hours covering anything from 1.5 kms to 3 kms without getting tired in the shoulders which is a real benefit when spin fishing rivers, how many casts and retrieves I would have over that time & distance would be in the high hundreds I would imagine.

    Okuma Celilo Finnese 6'6'' ULS 1-3kg trout rod, Okuma Helios HSX-20 spinning reel, a well balanced set up.

    One of the rewards of small stream fishing.
    ** Reels: All reels used are Okuma spinning reels, the models are as follows: Okuma ITX-1000, Okuma Inspira ISX-20B, Okuma Helios HSX-20, Epixor EXPT-20 & Okuma Ceymar C-10 spinning reels, these spinning reels are nice lightweight spinning reels that are well suited to the Okuma Celilo Finesse ULS 1-3kg (2-6lb) spin rods.
    ** Fishing lines: There's only one brand I use and have done so for many years, it's the Australian made & owned Platypus line which has come a long way since I first used it back in the 60's. The Super 100 UHT & Pulse Mono 4lb/6lb monofilament are the main ones I use in the clear & brown colour. The other Platypus line used is the Pretest Premium Grade 4lb monofilament, the 6lb leader is the Platypus Stealth FC 100% fluorocarbon line.
     

    A nice mix of lures used for the larger rivers.
    ** Lures: It's Mepps, Mepps & more Mepps inline spinners that I have in my small lures boxes, they range from the smallest & lightest starting with the #00 (0.9gms) Steamepps (black, gold, silver blades) #00 (1.5gm) Black Fury (black, gold, copper blades), Aglia ( Plain, Mouche Noire, Aglia Mouche Rouge in black, gold, copper blades), Bug spinners (Stone Fly, March Brown, White Miller & Cherry), Comet (silver, gold blades). These small lightweight spinners are ideal for shallow small streams/rivers as well as some of the larger rivers I fish. Next are the size #0 (2.5gm) & #1 (3.5gm) inline spinners same models & blade colours as above but with a few different models included such as the Aglia Fluo tiger, rainbo, brown & phospho colours, Aglia Furia, Aglia TW & TW Streamer. So as you can see I do carry a large variety of Mepps inline spinners, all of which I have caught trout on. I also carry several small hard body lures that get used on the trout when they are not in the mood to take the Mepps inline spinners which isn't all that often because 98% of my trout are caught on the Mepps spinners. The hard body lures are mostly in the 30mm to 60mm size, floating & suspending models, Pontoon 21, Daiwa, Atomic Hardz, Goldy minnow, & Rapala lure are just some of hard bodies I have on hand. I also carry a few Ghost & Switchblade lures as well, there's nothing better than having a good mix of lures when trout fishing rivers & streams.

    A good mix of lures etc that I use in the rivers/streams.
    ** Other items that I have with me when trout fishing the rivers: One of the main items is a landing net, the ones I used are all wooden framed with a soft plastic mesh that doesn't damage the fish. The good thing about using a wooden landing net is that it floats and I have mine attached to my vest with a two meter alligator strap. That way if I drop it while fast water fishing it floats and I just pull it back in with the strap. Other items I carry in the vest are: Small plastic containers with snap swivels, anti-kinks in it in case for some reason the main line breaks, you'll need them for replacement of the lost anti-kink set up. Small sharpening stone to keep the lure hooks sharps at all times, a small pair of pointed nose pliers that are used to pull a treble hook from a finger or hand, accidents do happen when handling a fish, it's quite easy to have the lure fly from the fish and lob in the finger or hand when it tosses the spinner/lure. Also one can get a hook in the hand when trying to take hold of a fish that's playing up in the net, the pliers are ideal for when you need to remove the hook. The pliers are also used for setting the treble hooks off center, I'm not a fan of straight trebles.

    My fishing vest set up.
     
    Digital scales are essential if you wish to weigh your catch as I do, I weigh the fish in the net then deduct the weight of the net from the total weight which gives you the fish weight. That way one's not handling, damaging or stressing the fish, if you are keeping the fish then it doesn't matter. A set of forceps is a must for removing hooks from the mouth or throat of the fish, it's much easier and less damaging to the fish than using bulky pliers. Another item that you should carry is a good fold up pocket knife, handy for gutting a fish if you intend on keeping it. A Boomerang duo zinger that has a line cutter attached to it for cutting fishing line. Another item I carry is a small first aid kit, it's compact and only carries a dozen or so small to large band aids, hay fever tablets and a dozen Panamax- Panadol tablets in case of headache or some other pain that may occur. A pair of polarised sunglasses is a must when fishing, they take the glare off the water and one can see the river bottom as well as the fish. My snacks I carry in my waders pocket are usually three Cadbury's chocolate Freddo frogs or a couple of small Mars bars, my drink is a can of Pepsi Max that I have once back at the car. My fishing camera is a Canon SX620HS compact camera a small reliable quality camera that takes a great photo & video, it's a must have when fishing to take a photo of what maybe your catch of a lifetime.

    The Canon SX620IS camera, it's small & packed with plenty of punch.
     
    ** As for some of my most memorable moments, well this has really got me thinking as there's been quite a few over my 56 years of trout fishing, hopefully I can remember most of them. There's two that always come to mind, the first time I went trout fishing to the Finniss River at Yundi in my home State of South Australia back in 1966. My rod was a 6' solid fibreglass one, the spinning reel I can't remember what brand it was, the lure was a brand new Mepps #1 silver Black Fury that I bought from Adelaide Fishing Tackle, silver was the only colour available back then. On that first trip trout fishing in the Finniss River I caught my first trout on the Mepps Black Fury, a trout that weighed 3 lbs, from that day on I was hooked on trout fishing. Another memorable moment was when I used to do a lot of salt water fishing in South Australia when I caught a 36 lb snapper (gutted weight) during a night time fishing trip in my boat back in 1973. I have a lot of very good memorable moments of my fishing adventures when I lived in South Australia, too many to mention in this article.
    Here's a few memorable moments since we made the move to Tasmania back in March 2000. I remember the first trip I had on opening day was to the Dasher River and being keen to get an early start I was at the river just as the sun rose. It was a very frosty morning, in fact it was so cold as I retrieved the spinner the water that came off the line onto the rod eyelets froze up and made it impossible to retrieve the spinner, I have never fished at first light in August since that day. From there I went down to Lake Barrington where I caught my first trout of the 2000-01 trout season on a Mepps gold #1 Black Fury spinner, it was a 1.5kg brown trout.
    On the last day of the 2017/18 trout season I caught a PB brown trout in a river, it went 3.85 kgs (8lbs 8ozs) and was caught in the River Leven at Gunns Plains. On the 3rd November 2019 I caught my 10,000th Tasmanian trout, something I never thought of achieving. Another winner on the Leven River was back in 2009 when I won the World Grasshopper Championship in the Carnival of the Grasshopper, I captained the two man team that day, I also won the Lord of the River for most trout caught as well as the heaviest fish. It was back in 2006 when I joined the Ulverstone Angling Club and to my surprise the first season with them I won the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for most trout caught in rivers and streams with 437 trout being caught. Since that time I have gone on to hold the Vic Whitehouse Memorial Trophy for the past 16 years (2006-2022) in a row. So there you have it, these are just a few of many memorable moments I've had over many years of fishing. Hopefully before it comes to a time when I have to call it a day, I can add a few more memorable moments to it.

    My PB wild brown trout, 8lb 8ozs, it was released back into the river as are all of the trout I catch.
    One other thing and this isn't a most memorable moment, it's just a little something extra for you to take in if you're just starting to fish the rivers. The more often you fish a river you'll get learn a lot more about it, like pockets of flat water behind rocks in the river, narrow flat waters close to the river banks, they are all fish holding areas, so you won't bypass them like you may have done to start with, you will flick a lure into them. You'll also get to know where it's safe enough to wade, where it's safe to cross the river, most of all, remember safety must come first, it must be a priority when fishing any river. No fish is worth drowning for, so please do not take any risks while fishing in any river, stay safe & tight lines. If and when you do catch a trout, remember to always wet your hands before handling the fish that way you don't remove it's protective slimy coating. I know a lot will keep a trout for a feed and that's fine, if you're not keeping it and just want to take a photo of yourself and the fish, be careful how you hold it. Don't take a vice like grip behind it's gills because that's where the heart & liver are and you will damage them, the fish will swim off, but it will more than likely die soon after it's release. Handle the fish as short a time as possible, even more so in hot weather when river trout are under stress due to warmer water temps. If you really don't need a selfie holding a fish, take a photo of it in the landing net and release it ASAP.

    The anti kink set ups I use when spin fishing for trout with Mepps inline spinners.

    A beautifully coloured Mersey River wild rainbow trout.
    cheers
    Adrian
  6. Thanks
    Meppstas reacted to doobie in A few trout come out to play.   
    Good luck for the new season.
    And as they say, you're going to need a bigger display unit  
  7. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from doobie in A few trout come out to play.   
    Thanks doobie, I hope I have as good a 2022/23 trout season too as I'm going for 17 years in a row for most trout caught in rivers and streams..
    cheers
    Adrian


  8. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from Yorky in A few trout come out to play.   
    This is one of my early trips of the 2021/22 trout season back in November, it was in one of my favorite small streams that I love to fish. Hope you enjoy the video & thanks for watching..
    Only 20 days to go now before the 2022/23 trout season opens..
    cheers
    Adrian (meppstas)
     
  9. Like
    Meppstas reacted to doobie in A few trout come out to play.   
    Always nice to go back over some fishing footage - especially when some nice trout were on the bite.
  10. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from doobie in A few trout come out to play.   
    This is one of my early trips of the 2021/22 trout season back in November, it was in one of my favorite small streams that I love to fish. Hope you enjoy the video & thanks for watching..
    Only 20 days to go now before the 2022/23 trout season opens..
    cheers
    Adrian (meppstas)
     
  11. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from doobie in The rewards of small stream fishing.   
    It was sad to hear about the cattle with their broken backs, yes a chainsaw may be a handy item too..
    Then again, some of those trees are massive, maybe a rope & grapple may come in handy.😀😀

  12. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from Yorky in The rewards of small stream fishing.   
    Just as the title reads, this is a video I put together on the rewards one can get from fishing small streams and it doesn't have to be in Tasmania either. 
    As most of you know it was in South Australia where I first started out chasing trout in small streams back in the late 60's. I hope you enjoy the video..👍
    cheers
    Adrian
     
  13. Like
    Meppstas reacted to doobie in The rewards of small stream fishing.   
    wow that is strong.  And not nice to find cattle with such injury.
    You may have to take a chain saw with you to clear the way  
  14. Thanks
    Meppstas reacted to doobie in The rewards of small stream fishing.   
    Great video Adrian and totally agree .... don't be under that tree when it comes down  
  15. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from Softy in The rewards of small stream fishing.   
    Just as the title reads, this is a video I put together on the rewards one can get from fishing small streams and it doesn't have to be in Tasmania either. 
    As most of you know it was in South Australia where I first started out chasing trout in small streams back in the late 60's. I hope you enjoy the video..👍
    cheers
    Adrian
     
  16. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from yellow door 1 in The rewards of small stream fishing.   
    Just as the title reads, this is a video I put together on the rewards one can get from fishing small streams and it doesn't have to be in Tasmania either. 
    As most of you know it was in South Australia where I first started out chasing trout in small streams back in the late 60's. I hope you enjoy the video..👍
    cheers
    Adrian
     
  17. Like
    Meppstas reacted to HB tragic in Winter bream   
    Thought I could start the ball rolling for this section by showing my latest lure aquisition to entice the local bream population. Enjoy. regards, HBt.

  18. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from mark1396235444 in South Aust river heights.   
    I don't know if those of you who fish the smaller rivers etc have this site set on your computer, I thought it may be of some use to those who fish the freshwater rivers/streams.
    It will give you the rivers heights that may be helpful, it's the same one I use for the rivers here in Tasmania.. Take note height etc of the day you fish one of these rivers, it will come
    in handy to know when the level is most suited for fishing  and may save a long drive after a heavy dose of rain, or even better a worthy drive if the water level is at the ideal height for fishing.
    cheers
    Adrian..
    http://www.bom.gov.au/sa/flood/rain_river.shtml
  19. Like
    Meppstas reacted to Softy in South Aust river heights.   
    Never seen that page before but thanks it could come in handy!

    Sent from my Pixel 6 using Tapatalk


  20. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from Wert in South Aust river heights.   
    I don't know if those of you who fish the smaller rivers etc have this site set on your computer, I thought it may be of some use to those who fish the freshwater rivers/streams.
    It will give you the rivers heights that may be helpful, it's the same one I use for the rivers here in Tasmania.. Take note height etc of the day you fish one of these rivers, it will come
    in handy to know when the level is most suited for fishing  and may save a long drive after a heavy dose of rain, or even better a worthy drive if the water level is at the ideal height for fishing.
    cheers
    Adrian..
    http://www.bom.gov.au/sa/flood/rain_river.shtml
  21. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from doobie in South Aust river heights.   
    I don't know if those of you who fish the smaller rivers etc have this site set on your computer, I thought it may be of some use to those who fish the freshwater rivers/streams.
    It will give you the rivers heights that may be helpful, it's the same one I use for the rivers here in Tasmania.. Take note height etc of the day you fish one of these rivers, it will come
    in handy to know when the level is most suited for fishing  and may save a long drive after a heavy dose of rain, or even better a worthy drive if the water level is at the ideal height for fishing.
    cheers
    Adrian..
    http://www.bom.gov.au/sa/flood/rain_river.shtml
  22. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from Softy in South Aust river heights.   
    I don't know if those of you who fish the smaller rivers etc have this site set on your computer, I thought it may be of some use to those who fish the freshwater rivers/streams.
    It will give you the rivers heights that may be helpful, it's the same one I use for the rivers here in Tasmania.. Take note height etc of the day you fish one of these rivers, it will come
    in handy to know when the level is most suited for fishing  and may save a long drive after a heavy dose of rain, or even better a worthy drive if the water level is at the ideal height for fishing.
    cheers
    Adrian..
    http://www.bom.gov.au/sa/flood/rain_river.shtml
  23. Sad
    Meppstas reacted to bjorn2fish in Aussie fishing icon Alvey Reels shutting the doors permanently after 102 years   
    Sad news reported today of Aussie fishing icon Alvey Reels shutting the doors permanently.
    Link to original article https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/manufacturing/australian-fishing-reel-brand-forced-to-close-after-102-years-amid-drastic-price-hikes/news-story/63caad4108d0191fc1da4a3269ae64c4
     
    Australian fishing reel brand forced to close after 102 years amid ‘drastic’ price hikes
    Iconic Australian brand Alvey Reels will shut permanently after 102 years in coming weeks as a result of immense market pressures.
    After more than a century in business, Australian fishing reel brand Alvey Reels will shut up shop permanently.
    Increased cost pressures have forced the Queensland-based manufacturer to close its doors after 102 years, according to a statement released on Monday.
    The company announced it had “made the difficult decision” to cease operation on June 30.

    It cited issues with sourcing raw materials, “drastic” cost increases, significant and increasing domestic and global supply chain logistics issues, and staff shortages caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.
    The company still had “significant supplies” to clear and has planned a “structured sell down”, the statement said.
    “We anticipate running with warehouse/dispatch and administration staff with current stock on hand, which will carry us through to January/February 2023, but we will not be able to remain open after this time,” it read.
    Products will remain available via its website, and authorised retailers will continue sales until they run out of stock.
    Calls to company phones will be diverted to an answering service to assist the admin team.

    “We at Alvey Reels deeply regret this difficult decision, and while we commit to supplying as many of our products as we can for as long as we can, our immediate priorities are our loyal staff, our dedicated retailers and passionate supporters and customers,” the business said.
    “On behalf of the Alvey Team, we thank you all for your 102 years of support.”
    The company experienced significant export market growth, product innovation and expansion as it entered its centenary year of 2020.
    Its success came off the back of an announcement in 2017 from Bruce Alvey – a descendant of the man who founded the business in 1920 – that it would need to shut because of plunging sales.
    When the news broke, there was an outpouring of support for the company that allowed it to continue trading.
    It ultimately attracted attention from Con Athans, who expanded the business to include a broader range of gear, including high-end apparel.
  24. Like
    Meppstas reacted to Rob62 in Weird, wonderful and strange   
    Thought I would start a post for all the Lureophiles out there to show off the Weird, Wonderful and Strange ones in there collection.
    So I'll start it off with nine from my collection
     
     
















  25. Like
    Meppstas got a reaction from Yorky in My second best trout of the 2021/22 season. (short video)   
    This is just a short video of the second best trout that I've caught in a river this season. I took a gamble filming it with my Canon camera while holding the trout rod in my left hand, thankfully the trout made it into the net. It certainly tested out the fine (0.15mm diameter) Platypus Pulse ultra thin 4lb premium mono line too.
    Thanks for watching.. This video is HD  make sure you change setting to suit..
    cheers Adrian.
     
     
×
×
  • Create New...